Asiana 214 Mishap, SFO, July 6, 2013: Stable Approaches & Go Around Procedures

Stabilized Approaches must be part of an Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) and not just a criteria, policy or even best practice.  Procedure means that it is a written set of steps and explanatory notes. Procedures are trained by the airline, checked by the FAA and continually verified, reviewed and updated by the FAA and theContinue reading “Asiana 214 Mishap, SFO, July 6, 2013: Stable Approaches & Go Around Procedures”

Lithium-Ion Aircraft Batteries as a Passenger and Cargo Smoke/Fire Risk

In fact three aircraft have been destroyed by fires caused by lithium ion batteries, one in 2006, two in 2010. But the FAA, NTSB and other government and official agencies categorize safety as related to passenger safety or a cargo acft only hazard and of no interest to passenger airline safety, such as the currentContinue reading “Lithium-Ion Aircraft Batteries as a Passenger and Cargo Smoke/Fire Risk”

US Passengers at Risk by FAA Fatigue Rule

Passengers on domestic US airlines are now at an increased risk of being  crashed into by sleepy cargo pilots. Lawyers at the FAA used case law, negligence reasoning and other historically based legal records to reach a regulatory milestone, aligning with lawyers at   large US based package express and airborne freight haulers. The FAA pointedContinue reading “US Passengers at Risk by FAA Fatigue Rule”

AF 447: High Altitude Stall or Swept Wing Stall? Did the Mishap Investigation Boards Make a Fundamental Aerodynamic Error?

The mishap investigation boards have given a less than aerodynamically correct presentation of “high altitude stalls” in the 2009 Loss of Control LOC mishap investigation of AF 447 and the  2005 Loss of Control LOC mishap in Venezuela of a West Caribbean Colombian MD82. The result is that these mishap investigation reports are not puttingContinue reading “AF 447: High Altitude Stall or Swept Wing Stall? Did the Mishap Investigation Boards Make a Fundamental Aerodynamic Error?”

Understanding Risk, Hazards and Mishap Prevention

It is critical to understand the terms risk and hazard. A hazard is a something that causes danger such as an incomplete or outdated procedure, an object such as a equipment, a malfunction or a human factor. The hazard is real, it is perceivable and most of all discoverable BEFORE any mishap, accident or incidentContinue reading “Understanding Risk, Hazards and Mishap Prevention”

Which costs more, a safe operation or an accident?

Many of the blog readers have wondered, “How cost effective is a good safety program?” So, let’s look at some well known accidents to see first of all how much they cost? Comair at Lexington will run about $700 million when it is all done. Colgan Air at Buffalo will run about $500-650 million whenContinue reading “Which costs more, a safe operation or an accident?”

Working Jointly as a Safety Manager: How does that work?

So now you are probably asking, “Okay, how do I get 14 pilot association committees to work with me, the airline safety manager?” I am so glad that you asked!!! The key to success here is by working Jointly with the pilot association. What is that? Your airline does not have a pilot association? Hmmm,Continue reading “Working Jointly as a Safety Manager: How does that work?”

Wind Rain and Slick Runways

Once again the winter cold water season approaches and I wonder how many airlines are training their pilots to recognize the safety hazard of a runway which is not grooved, combined with wind across the runway and water making the runway slick? “Slick” is not an engineering term, but the word describes well the lossContinue reading “Wind Rain and Slick Runways”